HomePlanning | Federal Planning  | State Planning | Air Monitoring

Planning


The District is responsible for achieving and maintaining healthful air quality for its residents.  The District accomplishes this through its efforts to attain federal and state ambient air quality standards and by limiting exposure to airborne toxins and nuisances. 

The Planning department is directly responsible for developing strategies to meet federal and state planning requirements, administering local incentive programs, and maintaining the District's air monitoring network.   The Planning department is also charged with reviewing environmental documents for projects subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). During review, staff works to ensure that all air quality impacts associated with land use and transportation are properly addressed and mitigated to the extent feasible. Additionally, other departments in the District administer programs in an effort to reduce emissions and improve air quality through implementation of permit requirements, rules and regulations, and compliance programs.

Ambient Air Quality Standards

Both the state and federal governments have established Ambient Air Quality Standards for criteria pollutants to help protect the public from the harmful effects of air pollution.  Based on collected monitoring data, the state and federal governments designate areas as “attainment” or “non-attainment” for the various pollutants. Below is a table of the current designations for the District for each of the criteria pollutants:

Criteria Pollutant

Averaging Time

State Standards

National Standards

Ozone (O3)

1-Hour

Non-attainment

N/A

8-Hour

Non-attainment

Non-attainment

Carbon Monoxide

1-Hour

Attainment

Unclassified/Attainment

8-Hour

Attainment

Unclassified/Attainment

Nitrogen Dioxide

1-Hour

Attainment

N/A

Annual

N/A

Attainment

Sulfur Dioxide

1-Hour

Attainment

N/A

24-Hour

Attainment

Attainment

Annual

N/A

Attainment

Coarse Particulate Matter (PM10)

24-Hour

Non-attainment

Unclassified

Annual average

Non-attainment

N/A

Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

24-Hour

N/A

Partial non-attainment

Annual average

N/A

Attainment

Sulfates

24-Hour

Attainment

N/A

Lead

30-Day Average

Attainment

N/A

Calendar Quarter

N/A

Attainment

Hydrogen Sulfide

1-Hour

Attainment

N/A

Vinyl Chloride

24-Hour

Attainment

N/A

Visibility Reducing Particles

8-Hour

Attainment

N/A

 

Most of the planning work done by the District relates to the two main pollutants of concern for the District Ozone and Particulate Matter: 

Ozone

Ozone is formed as a result of a photochemical reaction involving nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).  Sources of NOx are typically those that involve combustion activities including on and off road vehicle engines and boilers or process heaters at industrial facilities.  VOCs (also commonly referred to as reactive organic gases, or ROG) are commonly associated with consumer products and organic solvents.

Particulate Matter

Particulate matter consists of very small liquid and solid particles that can be suspended in air and inhaled.  Particulate matter can be coarse (PM10) or fine (PM2.5) depending on the actual diameter of the particle.  PM10 is particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less in diameter.  Sources of PM10 typically include motor vehicles, wood burning stoves and fireplaces, windblown dust from open land, construction and landfill dust, and wildfires.  PM2.5 is particulate matter measuring 2.5 microns or less in diameter.  The majority of PM2.5 is generated by the combustion of fuels.  PM2.5 is a primary public health concern because these particles are small enough to be inhaled and can become lodged into the deepest parts of the lung.

 

 

 

 

 
 

Home Board The District Announcements Contact Us